Tuesday, 6 May 2014

Drives me crazy

As you are all aware I have a liking for close up/ macro photography. I love nothing more than being on my hands and knees photographing some wonderful small critter or another. It hurts my knees and back something chronic though.

What I don't like so much is trying to correctly identify the critters I've caught. I have a number of books that I use and I search the web if I have an inkling of what it might be, what family/genus etc. Regularly though I am stumped. The following is one such critter.

I've never seen one before, it was only maybe 3-4 mm in body length. I'm guessing its not reached its maturity yet and may look completely different when it does.

In addition, what reference books do you use? If any of you can suggest a book that you have found invaluable I would be very grateful.

I've added a fair few shots to the gallery site over the last week or so, if you haven't had a look for a few days you may want to do so. Thanks


A Temminks stint has been at Wellington Gravel pits for a few days, Have I seen it? what do you think? Its the bird on the left.

Don't fret all you purists, I'm not claiming it as a tick for the year/lifer. That could just as easily be one of the many Common Sandpipers that frequent the pool, it was about 300 yards away. The books suggest that at that distance it might be difficult to tell them apart, and I sometimes wonder about these alleged sightings. The bird on the right is a Greenshank for size comparison.

Foot note:
I have had the creepy crawly identified, It is a nymph of a mirid bug called Calocoris Alpestris. Thanks to Joseph Botting at britishbugs.org.uk for his help with identification


Brian said...

Hi Brian. Not sure, but if you sign up for iSPOT you can post a photo (add observation) and you'll get some responses from experts. I think natural history museum do something similar.

Brian J Davis said...

Thanks Brian I will certainly look at that. As it happens I have had the photos identified from a couple of experts on a website I found. I think identification is going to be an ongoing problem so your idea is a sound one .

Brian said...

So don't keep us in suspense! What is it?

Brian J Davis said...

Its a Mirid Bug nymph. Calocoris Alpestris.